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Eritrean Refugees in Israel Sent to Uganda and Rwanda

Al Jazeera English | November 24, 2016

The sky was still an inky black when the flight from Cairo touched down at Entebbe Airport near Kampala, the capital of Uganda, one morning in mid-January, the fluorescent glow spilling from the small terminal providing the only source of light.

It had been 15 hours since Musgun Gebar left Tel Aviv, and the journey staggered him in its brevity. Four years earlier, when he had travelled the other way - from Eritrea in East Africa to Israel - he had done so on foot, a punishing journey across the Sahara and the Sinai that took more than a month.

Kidnappers stalked the route, food was scarce, and half of the people with whom he had travelled didn't survive. But this time, he simply sat down in a small cushioned seat and waited, snapping selfies and eating salty meals from aluminum tins until, suddenly, he had arrived.  


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Refugee Runners: The Olympics Fields its First Team Without a Country

The Christian Science Monitor | June 2, 2016

This August, when the 205 country delegations march into Rio de Janeiro’s Maracanã Stadium for the opening ceremony of the 2016 Summer Games, the procession will also be joined by a very different kind of Olympic team. For the first time in history, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) is fielding a small team of refugees – between five and 10 athletes who will represent not a country, but all those without one.


Melinda Josie / The New York Times

Melinda Josie / The New York Times

Standing Watch Over a New Life

The New York Times Magazine | November 24, 2015

Before I came to South Africa, I was at a refugee camp in Mozambique for six months. From that camp you could see a certain mountain. The shape of it was like a woman lying down. People there told me that if you go beyond that mountain, you’re in South Africa. They said it was a place where they take care of refugees. In South Africa, I heard, you could have a regular job and a regular life.

What they didn’t say was that to officially become a refugee in South Africa, you must go to the immigration office every day and wait in a line that never moves. You must sleep there, with newspapers for blankets, so that you don’t lose your spot. They also didn’t say that even when you have papers, the only jobs you can get are the ones South Africans don’t want.


See more: on looking for legal status from Asmara to Tel Aviv to Kampala, on Swagger, Confidence, and the stories Zimbabwean migrants tell with their unusual names, and on the undertow of xenophobia in South Africa and its origins